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murmursintheshadows:

Absolutely loved this talk. 

“Our lives are the sum of our memories. How much are we willing to lose from our already short lives by … not paying attention?” — Joshua Foer

leaveobashar:

CHILDREN WERE KILLED WHILE SEEKING SAFETY IN THE HANDS OF THEIR MOTHERS. ANOTHER MASSACRE IN SYRIA. Hama (Qubair): June 6, 2012 - In the words of @SeekerSK “The parents of the infants killed died twice. Once when their children were murdered. Once when they were shot or stabbed or both” 

Thanks @HamaEcho

leaveobashar:

ANOTHER CHILD IS KILLED AS ASSAD’S FOCES SHELL THIS TOWN DAY IN AND DAY OT FOR MONTHS ON END. Homs (Talbiseh): June 7, 2012 - Alaa Al-Shimali is only a 10 year old girl. What could she have possibly done to become a target of a shell landing and exploding in her house as she hid in terror from the shelling by Assad’s army.

Assad has killed 4 children a day since the revolution started 16 months ago.

Thanks @farGar

leaveobashar:

***HEARTBREAKING*** LISTEN TO THE SCREAMS OF PAIN AND FEAR. WHAT ON EARTH DID THIS BABY DO TO DESERVE HAVING SHELL SHRAPNEL PULLED FROM HIS HEAD. Homs (Talbiseh): June 7, 2012 - What more is there to say? The screams of the baby. The chaos in the makeshift clinic. The panic in the cameraman’s voice.

Assad’s forces are shelling this town to ‘punish’ the population for daring to ask for their freedoms.

Thanks @farGar

leaveobashar:

***EXTREMELY GRAPHIC*** THE MOST CRUEL AND BRUTAL TORTURE IN THE WORLD IS FOUND IN SYRIA - CARRIED OUR BY ASSAD’S MEN. Homs (Rastan): June 6, 2012 - The marks, scars, blood, cuts and holes speak volumes of the horror that Akram Al Shami endured for days, weeks or even months in the dungeons of Assad’s prisons.

No where on Earth is torture as widespread as in Syria. No where is it as brutal as in Syria. No other government on Earth seeks to torture their own citizens as Assad’s government. They relish the chance.

Thanks @farGar

leaveobashar:

THE FREE SYRIAN ARMY FIGHT BACK - A RUSSIAN MADE AND SUPPLIED T-63 TANK IS TARGETED AND EXPLODES VIOLENTLY. Idleb (Areeha) - The town of Ariha used to be known for it’s cherries amongst other fruits, vegetables and grains grown in the farming community. The cherries are used in a dish famous in Syria called ‘La7ma Bil Karaz” (Lamb with Cherries)

Today, this is Areeha. Assad’s forces have brutally shelled and occupied this town for months. The local FSA was then formed to defend the town and are now fighting back, destroying this Russian made and supplied tank in a violent explosion.

Thanks @Markito0171

peacecorps:

“Educating the people of Songwe on better breeding techniques, improved business skills, improved feed with local resources and giving livestock access to water would improve the livestock in the area and potentially improve the income of farmers.”

Peace Corps Volunteer Organizes Livestock Management Project in Zambia

vicemag:

BOOKS PEOPLE WROTE BECAUSE THEY WERE PISSED ABOUT WRITING
American Psycho By Bret Easton Ellis
This bro was pissed as fuck when he wrote this book! Apparently it’s not that fun to become mega famous off a book you wrote in college about college bros getting messed up and fucking, then marrying a rich woman and getting messed up every day too? Really, though, of all Ellis’s writing, this one is something else: it kind of takes the chode-ish obviousness of writing about banal rich kid life and turns it on its face. From the famous force-the-starving-rat-up-the-prostitute’s-ass to the blank descriptions of Phil Collins—in which I swear I get more feeling than most any of the anthologized-type American literature most traditionalists worship—this book is searing and hilarious on every page. And for as insane and over-the-top as people will tell you Ellis gets here, it’s actually massively fixated in how precisely dude’s brain had snapped at the time. Writing angry can be like writing drunk in that you’ll come back after the fact and see all you’ve done is shit all over some paper. But here it works, because Ellis was so tuned in to feeling like a fuck and he understood people’s tendency to just implode after a while. I could give a crap about his other novels but this one is something else. I wish he was this pissed at himself more often. 

J R by Williams Gaddis
Twenty years after his 950-page debut, The Recognitions, which pretty much everyone at the time took a shit all over, Gaddis came back with his second novel just shy of the same length. Whereas his first one was about painting forgers, this one is about money and a kid who can seemingly produce it out of thin air, trading penny stocks and other worthless paper until he’s amassed a fortune out of nothing. I’ve honestly never read a book that’s as big of a fuck you, over and over, to anybody, in my life. About 90 percent of the book is dialogue all held in an endless string of paragraphs, following one character after another as they bump into each other wherever in the world. And though the dialogue itself is amazing, spot on to how people really talk and hilarious in how ridiculous and confounded they all are, the tone of the book just seems to swoop around a center, screaming, “No one gives a shit about this and you aren’t listening and I’m tired and what the fuck.” Brief paragraphs crammed in the transom of conversation reveal some of the most bananas sentences you could ask for, all played almost as asides amongst people just blabbering about their money and what should be done with it, talking over one another, bleating. Seems like Gaddis meant to use his insane talent to crap on the face of everyone who read him, while still entertaining them to the point that he was able to win the National Book Award and bring the light back to his masterpiece—a triple retroactive fuck you even to himself.
Continue

vicemag:

BOOKS PEOPLE WROTE BECAUSE THEY WERE PISSED ABOUT WRITING

American Psycho By Bret Easton Ellis

This bro was pissed as fuck when he wrote this book! Apparently it’s not that fun to become mega famous off a book you wrote in college about college bros getting messed up and fucking, then marrying a rich woman and getting messed up every day too? Really, though, of all Ellis’s writing, this one is something else: it kind of takes the chode-ish obviousness of writing about banal rich kid life and turns it on its face. From the famous force-the-starving-rat-up-the-prostitute’s-ass to the blank descriptions of Phil Collins—in which I swear I get more feeling than most any of the anthologized-type American literature most traditionalists worship—this book is searing and hilarious on every page. And for as insane and over-the-top as people will tell you Ellis gets here, it’s actually massively fixated in how precisely dude’s brain had snapped at the time. Writing angry can be like writing drunk in that you’ll come back after the fact and see all you’ve done is shit all over some paper. But here it works, because Ellis was so tuned in to feeling like a fuck and he understood people’s tendency to just implode after a while. I could give a crap about his other novels but this one is something else. I wish he was this pissed at himself more often. 

J R by Williams Gaddis

Twenty years after his 950-page debut, The Recognitions, which pretty much everyone at the time took a shit all over, Gaddis came back with his second novel just shy of the same length. Whereas his first one was about painting forgers, this one is about money and a kid who can seemingly produce it out of thin air, trading penny stocks and other worthless paper until he’s amassed a fortune out of nothing. I’ve honestly never read a book that’s as big of a fuck you, over and over, to anybody, in my life. About 90 percent of the book is dialogue all held in an endless string of paragraphs, following one character after another as they bump into each other wherever in the world. And though the dialogue itself is amazing, spot on to how people really talk and hilarious in how ridiculous and confounded they all are, the tone of the book just seems to swoop around a center, screaming, “No one gives a shit about this and you aren’t listening and I’m tired and what the fuck.” Brief paragraphs crammed in the transom of conversation reveal some of the most bananas sentences you could ask for, all played almost as asides amongst people just blabbering about their money and what should be done with it, talking over one another, bleating. Seems like Gaddis meant to use his insane talent to crap on the face of everyone who read him, while still entertaining them to the point that he was able to win the National Book Award and bring the light back to his masterpiece—a triple retroactive fuck you even to himself.

Continue

good:

Infographic: Making Sense of the Farm Bill
The Farm Bill is the most important piece of legislation you’ve (probably) never heard of.  We collaborated with Dan Imhoff, the author of Food Fight 2012, and the designer Rosten Woo, to explore how this bill came into being, how it has shaped American agriculture, and how we can make it better. Dig in.
Learn more and view the infographic at GOOD.is

good:

Infographic: Making Sense of the Farm Bill

The Farm Bill is the most important piece of legislation you’ve (probably) never heard of.  We collaborated with Dan Imhoff, the author of Food Fight 2012, and the designer Rosten Woo, to explore how this bill came into being, how it has shaped American agriculture, and how we can make it better. Dig in.

Learn more and view the infographic at GOOD.is

good:

The Mutual: Giving Gets Perky
While giving for giving’s sake is great, these side benefits are powerful incentives. In fact, rewards might be just what people need to support environmental causes.  The Mutual is a smart, Groupon-esque online coupon book that scores deals for its community of givers. Donate $10 a month to a charity related to earth, air, water, education, or reform and have unlimited access to more than 140 “Perks,” courtesy of local businesses like Luke’s Lobster, Brooklyn Brewery, and Uncommon Goods.
Read more about the perks of giving at GOOD.is

good:

The Mutual: Giving Gets Perky

While giving for giving’s sake is great, these side benefits are powerful incentives. In fact, rewards might be just what people need to support environmental causes.  The Mutual is a smart, Groupon-esque online coupon book that scores deals for its community of givers. Donate $10 a month to a charity related to earth, air, water, education, or reform and have unlimited access to more than 140 “Perks,” courtesy of local businesses like Luke’s Lobster, Brooklyn Brewery, and Uncommon Goods.

Read more about the perks of giving at GOOD.is